Welcome to Urania Trust

Throughout human history men and women have been absorbed in exploring and trying to understand the relationship between each individual and the whole of creation.

This quest can be approached through the gateways of religious mysticism, theoretical physics, astrology, art, astronomy, transpersonal psychology, philosophy, sacred geometry, gaia theory etc.

The aim of the Urania Trust, as set out in its trust deed, is “to further the advancement of education by the teaching of the relationship between main’s knowledge of, beliefs about, the heavens and every aspect of his art science philosophy and religion.”

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Suggested Articles

Johannes Kepler (1571-1630)

Throughout his troubled life, Kepler sought for a Pythagorean unity between Astronomy and Astrology. He invented three new astrological aspects just as he discovered three laws of planetary motion. Both of these, he would have said, were a part of his quest for the Harmonices Mundi - the title of his magnum opus which he published in 1618 - just as the Thirty Years' War was breaking out in Germany.

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Astrology and Shakespeare, Part 2

In Astrology and Shakespeare, Part I, I argued that astrological symbolism shows up in Shakespeare’s works not only as single references but also as the archetypal basis for entire plays, as, for example, in Romeo and Juliet. Shakespeare’s familiarity with these symbols is clearly due to more than just acquaintance with the almanacs and calendars common in his time. Part of the profundity of his work is that he references the greater cosmological model that includes specific astrological details, a model originating in ancient times.

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Platonic Philosophy, Part 1: Introduction

It is said that when he was near his death, Plato had a dream in which he saw himself changed into a swan, and that as this swan he flew from tree to tree giving his pursuing fowlers the greatest difficulty in trying to net him: I don't think we need much imagination to see that the symbolism of this romantic tale is most apt. Of all the philosophers whose writings have survived more or less intact, Plato is, I think, the most difficult to feel that one has him and his meaning properly netted and secure...

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